Events
September
2019

Moon reflections: an age-old account of literary imagination and science

Henry Fuseli, Loneliness in the Morning Twilight - particular
Henry Fuseli, Loneliness in the Morning Twilight - particular
William Turner, Fishermen at sea - particular (Wikimedia Commons)
William Turner, Fishermen at sea - particular (Wikimedia Commons)
Réné Magritte, The Masterpiece or The Mysteries of the Horizon - particular (WikiArt)
Réné Magritte, The Masterpiece or The Mysteries of the Horizon - particular (WikiArt)
Vincent van Gogh, The Starry Night - particular (Wikimedia Commons)
Vincent van Gogh, The Starry Night - particular (Wikimedia Commons)
The Apollo 11 Crew (NASA, Wikimedia Commons)
The Apollo 11 Crew (NASA, Wikimedia Commons)
Paul Klee, Strong Dream (WikiArt)
Paul Klee, Strong Dream (WikiArt)
Alexander Calder, 7 Circles Abstract (WikiArt)
Alexander Calder, 7 Circles Abstract (WikiArt)
Title page and illustration from Galileo Galilei's Sidereus Nuncius
Title page and illustration from Galileo Galilei's Sidereus Nuncius
Giovanni Di Paolo, illustration for Dante's Paradise, Manuscript Yates Thompson 36
Giovanni Di Paolo, illustration for Dante's Paradise, Manuscript Yates Thompson 36

Institutional Communication Service

To mark the fiftieth anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission, Professor Stefano Prandi, director of the Institute of Italian Studies at USI, “brings” us to the Moon with a fascinating journey through literature and science – featuring, among others, Neil Armstrong's small step/giant leap, the poetic ode to the moon by Giacomo Leopardi, the intellectual legacy of Italo Calvino, the Supreme Poet Dante, the first astronaut, and Galileo Galilei's telescope.

The journey follows in the footsteps of the glorious literature (and not only) devoted to the celestial body that is also, and perhaps above all, a place of the imaginary, where the human being is reflected in his own limits and in his own dreams. The full text is available in Italian:

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